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  • Sundance Square

    Fort Worth, TX - 2010

    The new Central Plaza is the primary public outdoor gathering space in downtown Fort Worth and one of the most significant public outdoor gathering spaces in the entire region. The design of this space addresses and expresses the shared cultural values and aspirations of the Fort Worth community and fulfills the complex tasks of accommodating large events as well as day to day use of the plaza that calls for a more intimate scale. The plaza is an amenity, both functionally and aesthetically for the entire surrounding Sundance Square neighborhood. 

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  • Orioles Spring Training Facilities at Ed Smith Stadium

    Sarasota, FL - 2009

    The Ed Smith Stadium and Buck O'Neil Training Complex at Twin Lakes Park is spring training home to the Baltimore Orioles and a year-round rehabilitation facility.  A new 2-level concourse transforms the existing stadium from 6,500 to 9,000 seats with new luxury suites, specialty concessions, landscaped berms and picnic areas.

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  • Lon Evans Correctional Center

    Fort Worth, TX - 2005

    The five-level Tarrant County Jail is a much-needed expansion space.  Occupying a full city block and linked by skybridge and tunnel to the existing jail across the street, the new jail will accommodate high security detention units for both male and female inmates, an infirmary and central kitchen, staff areas, and a public visitation facility.  The County wanted a building that would blend into downtown Fort Worth without appearing overly institutional. The design is "Cowtown Deco" well known in Fort Worth.  The building’s overall mass is broken down by end-bays that project forward slightly, subtle changes in the exterior wall planes, and a mix of brick, cast-stone, and granite in varying finishes and colors. The building is targeting LEED Certification.

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  • The Smith Center for the Performing Arts

    Las Vegas, NV - 2007

    The Smith Center for the Performing Arts houses three performance spaces including a state-of-the-art 2,050-seat hall, and a cabaret theatre and flexible rehearsal space in the education center. The large theater is appropriate for first-run Broadway shows and major touring attractions, as well as symphony, opera, and dance. Opened in March 10, 2012, The Smith Center is the first major civic performance hall in the United States to earn LEED accreditation. Working with our sustainability consultant, Portland’s Green Building Services, the buildings achieved LEED Silver rating from the nation's foremost sustainability organization.

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  • USC Upstate Johnson College of Business and Economics

    Spartanburg, SC - 2008

    Charged with sparking economic redevelopment and reinvigoration in downtown Spartanburg, the 60,000 square foot, three-story George Dean Johnson, Jr. College of Business and Economics building is the University of South Carolina Upstate’s first downtown structure, and sits adjacent to the recently completed David M. Schwarz Architects-designed Chapman Cultural Center, reflecting a harmony with its next-door neighbor.  The College includes a business incubator space for new ventures in addition to technology-enhanced classrooms and faculty offices.  University and city officials see the College as an institution with great potential for the city of Spartanburg and a long-term commitment to higher education in the region.  The project is in the process of obtaining LEED certification.

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  • Southlake Town Square

    Fort Worth, TX - 1996

    Located in a fast growing, north central Texas community, Southlake Town Square began in 1996 as a 135-acre, fifteen to twenty year master plan for the City’s new downtown that could accommodate growth and change, yet feel whole at each stage. The master plan was designed to accommodate a total build-out of approximately 2.7 million square feet, including retail, restaurant, office, residential and civic uses.  With the Town Square at the focal point of the plan, the primary project goal was to create a development oriented to the pedestrian that would foster community.  The square is activated with two-story “office over retail” uses lining its edges and through rich programming of evening concerts, weekend festivals, and parades.  The City’s new town hall sits at the head of the square and solidifies its position as the center of Southlake’s civic life.

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  • 13th & U Streets NW

    Washington, DC - 2008

    Accommodating an estimated 132 rental apartments, ranging in size from 635 to 1400 square feet, along with street-level commercial uses, this new set of residences will further enhance the vibrant U Street corridor. The residential lobby will front onto U Street, flanked on each side by shop-fronts and retail entrances. Resident amenities include a club room, fitness area, and a rooftop pool. Below-grade off-street parking is also provided as well as accommodations for bicyclists. The building’s location takes advantage numerous of public transit options including several bus lines and the U street/Cardozo Metro Station located directly across 13th Street.

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  • Crown Farm

    Gaithersburg, MD - 2010

     

    Located on one of the last remaining large developable parcels in Montgomery County, Crown Farm will become a world class transit-oriented community of distinct neighborhoods interconnected by parks, woodlands, and walkable streets. Sited on approximately 180 acres, the project consists of over 2,000 residential units of varying types as well as 320,000 square feet of commercial and retail spaces in a variety of densities. David M. Schwarz Architects was commissioned to design the exterior facades of over 89,000 square feet of commercial space that will include a health club and various retail and restaurant tenants.

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  • Gaillard Center

    Charleston, SC - 2010

    Gaillard Center is a 1960’s era, general purpose 2,700-seat auditorium and exhibit hall. DMSAS was commissioned in 2010 to lead the design of a renovation and expansion of the facility. The project scope includes a full renovation of the auditorium, renovation and expansion of the existing exhibit hall into a banquet facility and the construction of an office building that will accommodate several of the City’s departmental offices currently decentralized in rented spaces. The exterior will be radically reworked with new entrance porticos on two sides, the addition of the Municipal Offices, and the Banquet Hall. A galleria promenade running the width of the building between the two entrance porticos will serve as a shared lobby for the performance hall, banquet hall and offices.

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  • The Pennsylvania Building

    Washington, DC - 2010

    The Pennsylvania Building, a Willco Companies development, is undergoing a third generation reincarnation. Originally built in the 1950’s and later redeveloped in the 1980’s by the Willco Companies, the building is being once again re-imagined and repositioned to exceed the high standards set by its high profile address at 1275 Pennsylvania, NW. The Pennsylvania Building flanks the east end of Freedom Plaza and is prominently located along the Presidential Inaugural Parade Route between the US Capitol and the White House.  Renovation plans for the 250,000 SF building include re-skinning the lower three floors of the exterior stone façade, a new metal and glass office entry marquee, improvements to the garage entry ramp, gutting and redesign of the office lobby and entry sequence including a two-story domed volume, and renovation of the typical floor elevator lobbies and restrooms. Construction is scheduled to begin in early 2012.

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David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc. is a design-oriented architecture firm that sees architecture as both an art and a service. The firm formed in 1976 in Washington, DC. Praise for our early historic preservation work earned us a reputation for “expressive” buildings. That reputation remains to this day.

Context is fundamental to our philosophy. Whether cultural, institutional, commercial, recreational, educational, mixed use, or residential, we see buildings as interactive parts of a larger whole. We design buildings of appropriate scale and detail to serve the people who use them.

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David M. Schwarz

David M. Schwarz

President & CEO

David M. Schwarz is President and CEO of David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc. He founded the firm in Washington, DC in 1976. In addition to his executive duties, Mr. Schwarz’s primary responsibility is as Principal in Charge of Design. He leads, orchestrates and reviews the design process of all the firm’s projects.

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David M. Schwarz

President & CEO

David M. Schwarz is President and CEO of David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc. He founded the firm in Washington, DC in 1976. In addition to his executive duties, Mr. Schwarz’s primary responsibility is as Principal in Charge of Design. He leads, orchestrates and reviews the design process of all the firm’s projects.

Mr. Schwarz received his B.A. at St. John’s College in Annapolis, MD, and Master of Architecture at Yale University. Mr. Schwarz currently serves as Chairman of the Yale School of Architecture Dean’s Council; a member of the Executive Committee of the Yale University Capital Campaign; a member of the jury of the Richard H. Driehaus Prize of the University of Notre Dame School of Architecture; on the Boards of Directors of the Wolfsonian Museum in Miami Beach Florida and the Youth Orchestra of the Americas in Arlington, VA; and a member of the National Council of the World Wildlife Fund. Additionally, he serves as the Jury Chairman for the Vincent J. Scully Prize Fund Endowment of the National Building Museum.
 

Craig Williams

Craig Williams

Principal

Craig Williams, Project Manager and Principal of David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc., has been with the firm since 1979. He received his education at The University of Maryland School of Architecture and was also an Architectural History teaching assistant. He has been registered in the District of Columbia since 1984.

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Craig Williams

Principal

Craig Williams, Project Manager and Principal of David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc., has been with the firm since 1979.  He received his education at The University of Maryland School of Architecture and was also an Architectural History teaching assistant.  He has been registered in the District of Columbia since 1984.

Craig is known around the office for his sardonic humor and has mellowed tremendously over the years. One of the things he most appreciates about being an architect is learning through our work about the businesses and industries in which he has interests - Lunn Gallery & photography, Beringer & the wine industry, Concert Halls & classical music and opera.

Outside of the office Craig spends time with his wife Kim and their Dalmatian Lucky and pursues his interests in black and white photography, wine and cooking multi-course meals for friends and family - the latter is an activity he especially enjoys because it yields a first-class, gourmet feast and accompanying oohs and aahs in a fraction of the time it takes to complete a concert hall.

Michael Swartz

Michael Swartz

Principal

Michael Swartz is a Principal of David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc., serves as the Corporate Treasurer and works as a Project Manager. He has been with the firm since 1982. He is a graduate of Carnegie Mellon University and is registered in the District of Columbia and Georgia. Michael is LEED accredited, and is an active member of the Congress for New Urbanism, AIA, and ULI.

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Michael Swartz

Principal

Michael Swartz is a Principal of David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc., serves as the Corporate Treasurer and works as a Project Manager.  He has been with the firm since 1982.  He is a graduate of Carnegie Mellon University and is registered in the District of Columbia and Georgia.  Michael is LEED accredited, and is an active member of the Congress for New Urbanism, AIA, and ULI.

Michael is a bit of a workaholic, but when he does manage to put his pencil down he can be found renovating his house (the one project he has managed that continues to elude all schedules), participating in volunteer activities in the community, doing pro-bono architecture for all his friends, or out and about with sketch pad and camera documenting the good, the bad and the ugly of the man-made world.  Favorite movie:  Dr. Strangelove; Favorite book:  A Confederacy of Dunces; Least favorite activity: Sleep

Gregory Hoss

Gregory Hoss

Principal

Gregory Hoss, Project Manager and Principal of David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc., has been with the firm since 1997 and has been a registered architect since 1994. He is a graduate of The Catholic University of America where he now serves on the Design Council. Gregory earned a dual degree in Architecture and Civil Engineering.

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Gregory Hoss

Principal

Gregory Hoss, Project Manager and Principal of David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc., has been with the firm since 1997 and has been a registered architect since 1994. He is a graduate of The Catholic University of America where he now serves on the Design Council.  Gregory earned a dual degree in Architecture and Civil Engineering. He is a member of the District of Columbia Building Industry Association (DCBIA) and the American Institute of Architects (AIA), as well as a member of The Catholic University of America's School of Architecture Development Board. Before joining DMSAS, he spent the first phase of his career planning and designing airport terminals around the world.

While practicing architecture is Gregory’s life's passion, his real joy is spending time with his partner Lars, and his family and friends. He also sings professionally in various Washington, DC choruses, and at one time contemplated a musical career as a classical pianist. He owns a 1907 Washington row house with Lars that provides ongoing "architectural" learning opportunities and experience. Gregory still looks forward to the Christmas season with a kid's wonder.

Tom Greene

Tom Greene

Principal, Retired

Tom Greene is a Principal of David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc. He serves as Chairman of the Board of Directors. He has been with the firm since 1978. He served full-time as a Project Manager until his retirement at the end of 2010. He now works part-time.

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Tom Greene

Principal, Retired

Tom Greene is a Principal of David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc. He serves as Chairman of the Board of Directors. He has been with the firm since 1978. He served full-time as a Project Manager until his retirement at the end of 2010. He now works part-time.

Tom graduated Cum Laude from the University of Maryland where he also served as a teaching assistant. He is a licensed architect in 14 states and is LEED accredited. He is a member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) and is certified by the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB). He is actively involved in various professional organizations including the District of Columbia Building Industry Association (DCBIA). He was the firm’s liaison to the United States Green Building Council from 2001 until 2010. He currently serves on the Mid-Atlantic Association of Museums’ Building Museums Symposium Planning Committee.

Sean Nohelty

Sean Nohelty

Director

Sean Nohelty is a Project Manager and Director of David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc. Sean was a teaching assistant and student intern at the University of Notre Dame before graduating Summa Cum Laude in 1997, the same year he joined DMSAS. In addition to being the chairman of the firm’s Charitable Giving Committee, Sean also serves as University Fellowship Coordinator and Employee Recruiting Coordinator. Sean is a registered Architect in Washington, D.C. and Texas and holds LEED BD+C Certification.

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Sean Nohelty

Director

Sean Nohelty is a Project Manager and Director of David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc. Sean was a teaching assistant and student intern at the University of Notre Dame before graduating Summa Cum Laude in 1997, the same year he joined DMSAS. In addition to being the chairman of the firm’s Charitable Giving Committee, Sean also serves as University Fellowship Coordinator and Employee Recruiting Coordinator. Sean is a registered Architect in Washington, D.C. and Texas and holds LEED BD+C Certification.

Outside of the office, Sean is actively involved in the District of Columbia Building Industry Association Leaders in Development (DCBIA DLD), the Institute of Classical Architecture & Art (ICAA), and the Washington Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA|DC) for which he served as President in 2014.

Outside of the architectural world, Sean volunteers his time as a founding member of the Board of Ngoma Center for Dance, a charitable organization that aims to provide minority youths and adults with a deeper understanding of dance as an art and a discipline. 

Jeffrey Loman

Jeffrey Loman

Associate

Jeffrey Loman is an associate at David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc. and has been with the firm since 1988. Born and raised in France, he attended Architecture School in Bordeaux where he was awarded the Grand Prix d’Architecture de L’Academic des Beaux-Arts, formally referred to as the Grand Prix de Rome.

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Jeffrey Loman

Associate

Jeffrey Loman is an associate at David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc. and has been with the firm since 1988. Born and raised in France, he attended Architecture School in Bordeaux where he was awarded the Grand Prix d’Architecture de L’Academic des Beaux-Arts, formally referred to as the Grand Prix de Rome.

Jeffrey has contributed his design acumen to many of the institutional, sports, and arts facilities the firm has worked on throughout his time at DMSAS. In addition to his role as a designer, Jeffrey also creates the in-house, handcrafted architectural drawings and watercolor vignettes for the firm. He regularly holds workshop sessions on architectural expression for the staff architects and designers within the office.

Away from the watercolors, Jeffrey shares his passion for the arts with his wife Florence, also a French born architect. An avid and competitive long distance swimmer, he regularly competes in the pools, lakes, and rivers around the D.C. area. Jeffrey represents the state of Maryland for the National Senior Olympics. 

Ted Houseknecht

Ted Houseknecht

Associate

Ted Houseknecht is an Associate at David M. Schwarz Architects and has been with the firm since 1991. Ted received his Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Maryland in 1986 and his Master of Architecture from Arizona State University in 1988.

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Ted Houseknecht

Associate

Ted Houseknecht is an Associate at David M. Schwarz Architects and has been with the firm since 1991. Ted received his Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Maryland in 1986 and his Master of Architecture from Arizona State University in 1988.

Ted is LEED accredited and a registered architect in Texas, Massachusetts, Utah, Washington, D.C. and Ontario, Canada. A member of both NCARB and the AIA, Ted is also actively involved with the Society of College and University Planning (SCUP) and the Washington Building Congress, where he serves as a Juror for their annual Craftsmanship Awards program.

With a passion for the decorative arts, industrial design and furniture, Ted has been involved with much of the firm’s residential design work. These passions abound outside of the office as well, as Ted is a collector of many things, valuable and not; from books and prints, to tools and rum. Ted’s favorite methods of transportation are on his bicycle, on his skis, and in his car as he serves as chauffeur to his children.

Steve Knight

Steve Knight

Associate

Steve Knight is an Associate with David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc. Originally from Massachusetts and raised in North Carolina, Steve settled in-between after receiving his Master of Architecture from North Carolina State University in 1997, the same year he joined DMSAS.

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Steve Knight

Associate

Steve Knight is an Associate with David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc. Originally from Massachusetts and raised in North Carolina, Steve settled in-between after receiving his Master of Architecture from North Carolina State University in 1997, the same year he joined DMSAS.

Steve chairs the firm’s Continuing Education Committee and serves as the Recruitment Coordinator for the design staff. While well versed on a variety of project types, Steve primarily focuses on the firm’s performing arts venue projects. He served as Job Captain for the design of Schermerhorn Symphony Center, The Palladium at the Center for the Performing Arts, and most recently the Gaillard Center.

Outside of the office, Steve is an active member of the Art Deco Society of Washington for which he serves as the Deputy Preservation Chair. The ever considerate citizen, he is also regularly involved with his neighborhood civic association in the Silver Spring area, where he lives in a restored bungalow with his lovely wife, Karen. Steve’s favorite things: two tone wing tips (which he flaunts around the office daily), Anita O’Day, and rendered duck fat. 

Joe Rapazzo

Joe Rapazzo

Associate

Joe Rapazzo is an Associate at David M. Schwarz Architects Inc., and works as a senior designer. Joe is a registered architect in the District of Columbia. He has a Master of Architecture degree from the University of Virginia and a BA from Brooklyn College, CUNY. In 1987, Joe started as a summer intern at DMSAS and has worked at the firm for all but five years of his career. He has participated in numerous projects at DMSAS both large and small, from Nancy Lee & Perry R. Bass Performance Hall to private residences.

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Joe Rapazzo

Associate

Joe Rapazzo is an Associate at David M. Schwarz Architects Inc., and works as a senior designer. Joe is a registered architect in the District of Columbia. He has a Master of Architecture degree from the University of Virginia and a BA from Brooklyn College, CUNY.  In 1987, Joe started as a summer intern at DMSAS and has worked at the firm for all but five years of his career. He has participated in numerous projects at DMSAS both large and small, from Nancy Lee & Perry R. Bass Performance Hall to private residences.

As an undergraduate Art major at Brooklyn College, Joe studied drawing and anatomy extensively as well as photography.   To this day he continues to paint and sketch regularly.  Much of his work examines people inhabiting the built environment with an eye for underlying geometries and the play of light.  The overlap of these interests with architecture led to Joe’s choice of a career.

Ramsay Fairburn

Ramsay Fairburn

Associate

Ramsay Fairburn, Project Manager and Associate at David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc. has been with the firm since 1994. She graduated from the School of Architecture of the University of Maryland with a Master of Architecture in 1995 and has been registered in the state of Virginia since 2009. Ramsay also holds a degree in Anthropology from Haverford College and is a member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

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Ramsay Fairburn

Associate

Ramsay Fairburn, Project Manager and Associate at David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc. has been with the firm since 1994. She graduated from the School of Architecture of the University of Maryland with a Master of Architecture in 1995 and has been registered in the state of Virginia since 2009. Ramsay also holds a degree in Anthropology from Haverford College and is a member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA).

When not in the office hard at work, Ramsay spends quite a bit of time at her second job as a professional soccer-mom. Ramsay enjoys the thrill of yelling and cheering-on (all positive, of course) her daughter as she competes across the Northern Virginia area with Arlington Travel Soccer. Thankful for Google Maps, Ramsay has seen more of Arlington and surrounding suburbs than she would have ever seen on her own. 

Jon Zubiller

Jon Zubiller

Associate

Jon Zubiller is an Associate at David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc. and has been with the firm since 2001. Jon is a graduate of Carnegie Mellon University where he earned bachelor degrees in both Architecture and Civil & Environmental Engineering. Jon received his LEED accreditation in 2004 and is an active member of several professional organizations, including the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), Urban Land Institute (ULI), and the Commercial Real Estate Development Association (NAIOP). A consistent contributor to much of the firm’s master planning work, Jon is dedicated to creating great urban places.

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Jon Zubiller

Associate

Jon Zubiller is an Associate at David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc. and has been with the firm since 2001. Jon is a graduate of Carnegie Mellon University where he earned bachelor degrees in both Architecture and Civil & Environmental Engineering. Jon received his LEED accreditation in 2004 and is an active member of several professional organizations, including the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), Urban Land Institute (ULI), and the Commercial Real Estate Development Association (NAIOP). A consistent contributor to much of the firm’s master planning work, Jon is dedicated to creating great urban places.

He also takes great pleasure in living and playing in them; particularly when it includes his wife, his young daughter, or a baseball diamond. Jon continues to play center field in a local wood bat league and vows to hang up the spikes only after he can no longer steal a base, or he is signed by an MLB team, whichever comes first. Between games, Jon enjoys time spent with his wife and daughter in their 100 year old home, planning renovations that he swears he’ll do someday. 

Jon Toonkel

Jon Toonkel

Associate

Jon Toonkel is an Associate at David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc. and has been with the firm since 2006. He is a graduate of Carnegie Mellon University and is a registered architect in the District of Columbia. Jon is LEED accredited and is a member of the American Institute of Architects, the District of Columbia Building Industry Association (DCBIA) and its Leaders in Development (DLD) group.

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Jon Toonkel

Associate

Jon Toonkel is an Associate at David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc. and has been with the firm since 2006. He is a graduate of Carnegie Mellon University and is a registered architect in the District of Columbia. Jon is LEED accredited and is a member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the District of Columbia Building Industry Association (DCBIA) and its Leaders in Development (DLD) group.

Before joining DMSAS, Jon began his career working for a map media company creating custom maps and guides for countless destinations around the country. Jon greatly enjoys traveling and experiencing the culture, food, and architecture of new places. Having grown up outside New York City, he is still in awe each time he walks through the main concourse at Grand Central Terminal. While in D.C., Jon can be seen walking through the historic neighborhoods in and around Kalorama with trusty sidekick, Stella, a ten pound Pekinese-poodle mix.

1976

David M. Schwarz goes to Washington, DC

David M. Schwarz goes to Washington, DC

1978

Incorporation


Incorporation

1979

Joining the Firm

Thomas H. Greene and Craig P. Williams join the firm

Joining the Firm

1982

First New Construction

First new commercial project construction opens:

1718 Connecticut Avenue

First New Construction

First New Construction

First new multi-family residential construction commission in Washington, DC:

The Griffin

First New Construction

1983

Fifth Anniversary

Fifth Anniversary Invitation

Fifth Anniversary

Joining the Firm

Michael C Swartz joins the firm

Joining the Firm

1984

First Commission

First commission working as Design Architect

First Commission

1985

First Major Commission

First major commission outside of Washington, DC:

Cook Children's Medical Center Office and NICU Expansion

First Major Commission

1988

Office Moves

Office moves to 1133 Connecticut Avenue

Office Moves

Fort Worth Master Plan

Begin work on Fort Worth Master Plan. Still building it today!

Fort Worth Master Plan

Tenth Anniversary

Tenth anniversary invitation

Tenth Anniversary

1991

Ballpark at Arlington

First sports commission:

Ballpark at Arlington

Ballpark at Arlington

1992

Sundance West

First residential building in downtown Fort worth since before WWII:

Sundance West

Sundance West

First AIA / Sundance Award


First AIA / Sundance Award

1994

Worthington Hotel

First hospitality project:

Worthington Hotel

Worthington Hotel

First Phone Book Cover

First phone book cover:

Ballpark at Arlington

First Phone Book Cover

1997

Southlake

Ongoing work beginning with Master plan:

Southlake Town Hall

Southlake Townhouses

Southlake

Joining the Firm

Gregory M. Hoss joins the firm.

Joining the Firm

1998

American Airlines Center

Firm wins design competition:

American Airlines Center

American Airlines Center

Bass Hall

First performing arts project opens:

Bass Hall

Bass Hall

2000

University Fellowships

University Fellowships program started.

University Fellowships

Severance Hall

Cleveland Orchestra starts 21st Century in renovated hall:

Severance Hall

Severance Hall

2001

Yale

First university project opens:

Yale

Yale

First Monograph

First monograph published.

First Monograph

Chateau St. Jean Vineyard

First West Coast project opens:

Chateau St. Jean Vineyard

Chateau St. Jean Vineyard

2002

National Cowgirl Museum & Hall of Fame

First museum project opens:

National Cowgirl Museum & Hall of Fame

National Cowgirl Museum & Hall of Fame

2006

Gingertown

Gingertown founded.

Gingertown

2007

The Smith Center

LEED Gold registered project:

The Smith Center

The Smith Center

DMSAS Foundation

David M. Schwarz Foundation started.

DMSAS Foundation

2008

30th Anniversary Gala

30th Anniversary Gala & name change.

30th Anniversary Gala

Second Monograph

Second monograph published.

Second Monograph

2010

Gingertown

Gingertown goes national.

Gingertown

Working at DMSAS

Somewhere along the line, architecture firms forgot the meaning of “studio.” The term came to mean a collection of people, rather than a hive of creative collaboration.  At DMSAS, we hold fast to tradition. Our design studio is a true studio—a wide-open, organic environment where project teams almost literally live together.

From back of napkin brainstorming to scale models (that’s right, we still do real 3D models), our projects come to life in full view. Everyone can witness the design evolve. Everyone can feel free to push, prod, question or compliment.

We  provide a broad range of experiences. We offer travel opportunities. We reimburse for intriguing educational programs and lectures. We maintain a diverse calendar of in-house lectures, presentations, and speakeasies.

We are in a continual search for talented professionals with superior design, graphic, CAD, and communication skills. Pride of authorship belongs to the team, but, for us, collaboration doesn’t begin or end with the project team. A good idea is a good idea no matter its source.

For further employment information, feel free to contact us through our Contact form.

The Real Yellow Pages

Recognition

If a community is defined by its significant buildings, then there is no greater testament to the status of any one building than to make the cover of the phone book. The phone book is to architecture, what Rolling Stone is to rock n’ roll—a testament to a building’s stature, its symbolism, its place within the community.

The buildings of DMSAS have been so honored numerous times. We consider it our highest accolade.

Greater Arlington
Greater Fort Worth
Southwestern Bell Arlington
Fort Worth White Pages

Selected Awards

2014 Congress for the New Urbanism, Charter Award - Best District Sundance Square
2014 The Institute of Classical Architecture & Art, Arthur Ross Award Body of Work
2014 Building Stone Institute, Tucker Design Award Schermerhorn Symphony Center
2013 Brick in Architecture Awards Competition, Gold Winner in Municipal/Government Buildings Lon Evans Corrections Center
2012 National Terrazzo & Mosaic Assoc, Inc.- Honor Award The Smith Center for the Performing Arts
2012 GE Edison Award of Merit for Lighting Design The Smith Center for the Performing Arts
2012 The Addison Mizner Medal for Excellence in Classical & Traditional Architecture Ed Smith Stadium
2011 Downtown Fort Worth Trailblazer Award, Preservation & Adaptive Reuse Sid Richardson Museum
2009 Downtown Fort Worth Trailblazer Award - Urban Design Sanguinet Building
2010 Urban Land Institute Award for Excellence Fort Worth Master Plan
2010 Society of American Registered Architects USC Upstate College of Business & Economics
2008 Society of American Registered Architects, Professional Design Award Private Residence
2008 Society of American Registered Architects, Professional Design Award Chapman Cultural Center
2008 Downtown Fort Worth Trailblazer Award, Sustainable Development Sundance West & Sanger Lofts
2008 Downtown Fort Worth Trailblazer Award, Placemaking Nancy Lee & Perry R. Bass Performance Hall
2007 Marble Institute of America, Pinnacle Award of Excellence Schermerhorn Symphony Center
2007 Society of American Registered Architects, Design Award of Merit Schermerhorn Symphony Center
2007 The National Sculpture Society, The Henry Fielding Memorial Medal Nancy Lee & Perry R. Bass Performance Hall
2006 Texas Topping Out 2006, Top 10 Award Tarrant County Family Law Center
2006 Texas Topping Out 2006, Top 10 Award Firewheel Town Center
2005 Associated Builders and Contractors–National, Eagle Award Tarrant County Family Law Center
2005 Texas Topping Out 2005, Top 10 Award West Village
2003 BallParks.com, Best New Ballpark for 2003 Dr Pepper Ballpark
2003 American Institute of Architects, Fort Worth Chapter, Excellence In Architecture Award, Award of Merit Dr Pepper Ballpark
2003 American Institute of Architects, Fort Worth Chapter, Excellence In Architecture Award, Citation Award Nancy Lee & Perry R. Bass Performance Hall

Process

Process matters. We begin with multiple concepts, then narrow and refine. Our goal is the most appropriate solution—the one that best solves the problem at hand.

We believe design is a fluid exchange and a shaping of ideas between client and architect—it is iterative and it is interactive. There can be no predetermined solutions.

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Discovery Phase

In Discovery, we work with the client to define the program, budget, scope and quality expectations. The goal is an overall set of project expectations. This phase may include a thorough site analysis and assessment of design options. Context is considered, as well. We develop an understanding of surrounding community, and the emotional and historical setting.

Schematic Design

Schematic Design establishes the scale and relationship of project components and the character of the project, exploring options, vetting each, and developing only the most appropriate. The entire team will evaluate the design for compliance with LEED sustainability certification criteria.

Design Development

Upon client approval of the Schematic Design, DMSAS will prepare documents to describe the size and character of the facility. This includes complete drawings, details and design specifications of the appearance of the exterior façade and all interior spaces. We consider both first costs and life-cycle costs of the design and materials. We build scale models, augmenting with 3D rendering if necessary.

Construction Documents Phase & Final Completion

Typically, upon approval of Design Development and its accompanying cost estimate, we work with an Architect of Record – usually on the project team from design inception – who will have primary responsibility for preparation of the Contract Documents, coordination the biding, and providing Construction Phase Services.  However, this is not a hand-off.  We remain fully involved until completion, providing our clients review and advisory services to help ensure that the architectural design intent, established in the earlier phases, is faithfully executed in the final project.  We review that Contract Documents, bids, and selected construction submittals, along with site observation on a regular basis with a keen eye for design integrity.

Sustainability

DMSAS takes a holistic approach to sustainability. Sustainability is not just about the latest materials or newest fad, but about efficient energy use, program arrangement, and site planning. The most sustainable buildings are those which stand the test of time, create a place in a community and continue to be reused and reinvented.  DMSAS has been a member of the US Green Building Council since 2001.  With 16 LEED AP on staff, DMSAS can take a building through all levels of certification, but we also design to a high standard of sustainability whether or not LEED certification is part of the process.

Community

At DMSAS, we have a deep and abiding passion for community. Whether we are trying to capture the spirit of a community in a design, or supporting the communities where we live through various charitable efforts, the places and the people that surround us are at the heart of everything we do.

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Outreach

David M. Schwarz Architects actively supports local arts, architecture, education and community organizations. Firm employees participate annually in numerous events and programs, including Washington Architecture Foundation's CANstruction and Architecture in the Schools programs, DCBIA Community Improvement Day, the Greater DC Cares Servathon, Phelps Architecture, Engineering and Construction High School Summer Session, Fannie Mae Walk for the Homeless and the JDRF Real Estate Games.

David M. Schwarz Charitable Foundation

The David M. Schwarz Architects Charitable Foundation supports non-profit events and organizations that improve the conditions of life, produce social and educational opportunities associated with architectural design, advance fine and performing arts and the preservation of built environments, and promote the stewardship of our shared resources.

Gingertown

It's not just Santa's little elves that are hard at work at Christmas time.  It's architects too!  Founded in 2006 by David M. Schwarz Architects, GINGERTOWN is a one-of-a-kind holiday initiative that brings together the leading architects, designers, and architectural firms in the D.C. area with building enthusiasts - young and old - to create a town made completely of ginger bread.  And, it's all for a good cause.

Visit the GINGERTOWN website

Education

David M. Schwarz Architects is preparing the next generation of architects and planners, at all levels of their education. We have supported childhood education and college preparatory programs in the building arts, including relationships with the Phelps School in Washington, DC.
 

Fellowships

Since 2000, David M. Schwarz Architects sponsors an annual summer Internship & Traveling Fellowship Awards program. We believe that seeing and experiencing the world's architecture first hand is an integral part of an architect's continual education. We offer the fellowships as opportunities for students to enhance and broaden their academic experience through independent travel and research, and immersion in our process & working environment.

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University of Notre Dame

The University of Notre Dame School of Architecture offers two David M. Schwarz Architects Internship & Traveling Fellowship Awards annually. A ten-week paid internship at Schwarz’s Washington, DC office is accompanied by a stipend for travel and independent research during the summer before the students’ the final year of study.

 

Download the 2014 Internship & Fellowship Application

University of Maryland

At the University of Maryland School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation, we offer one David M. Schwarz Architects Internship & Traveling Fellowship Award—a ten-week paid internship at Schwarz’s Washington, DC office that is accompanied by a stipend for travel and independent research during the summer leading into the students’ final year of study.

 

Download the 2014 Internship & Fellowship Application

Yale University

At the Yale School of Architecture, we offer one annual David M. Schwarz Internship & Traveling Fellowship Award—a ten-week paid internship at Schwarz’s Washington, DC office that is accompanied by a stipend for travel and independent research during the summer leading into the students’ the final year of study.

 

Download the 2014 Internship & Fellowship Application

Yale University Good Times Award

At Yale, we also offer an annual commencement prize, the David M. Schwarz Architects Good Times Award a stipend for travel and independent research during the summer following graduation.

For additional details on the Good Times Award, see the 2014 Yale Good Times Award Information.

Studios

David Schwarz has taught studios to Master of Architecture candidates at Yale and Notre Dame Universities. The Teaching in Las Vegas design studios focused on urban revitalization and civic building projects on the Las Vegas Strip.

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Yale University

During the Fall 2008 semester, David Schwarz served as the Davenport Visiting Professor at the Yale School of Architecture. Forty years after Robert Venturi, Denise Scott Brown, and Steven Izenour took a group of Yale students to the Las Vegas Strip to ask “what can the rest of the world learn from Las Vegas?”, David took a group of Yale students back to the Strip to ask “what can Las Vegas learn from the rest of the world?”

Notre Dame

In 2010, David began teaching a fifth-year design studio at Notre Dame. Like the 2008 Yale School of Architecture studio, the Notre Dame students will be working on a master plan and building design for the Harrah's center-Strip Las Vegas campus. Notre Dame's focus on traditional architecture might seem at odds with the Strip's glitzy buildings and spectacles, but the school's focus on historic building and planning suggests the perfect balm to transition the Strip from its past automobile-centric planning into a pedestrian friendly place.

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  • Postcard from Las Vegas: The Smith Center

    Vegas casinos have spent so much money and effort on creating miniature versions of the most urban places on earth -Venice, Rome, New York, Paris -yet have completely failed to build a single thing resembling a piece of real city. The Smith Center is exactly that missing element, a glimpse of genuine urbanity. It is not, however, entirely unthemed-it is executed in impeccable Jazz Age art deco. 

    David M Schwarz, its architect, argues that deco is the city's default style, the style of the 1930s buildings beneath the neons and of the Hoover Dam. It's interesting that in the wake of the phenomenal success of a film such as The Artist , as pure a pastiche as it is possible to get, no critic has chided the director for using a historicist technique. Yet, in architecture, the merest whiff of a revival creates a murmur. Is that confidence in the absolute rightness of contemporaneity -or is it insecurity?

    Either way, the Smith Center is an enjoyably complex work. 

    Download PDF →
    Postcard from Las Vegas: The Smith Center
  • Taller Buildings Don't Have to be Ugly

    The news that Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), who chairs the House committee overseeing the District, is considering easing building height restrictions in the nation's capitol has set the architecture and development communities abuzz.

    And like many other debates, the discussion threatens to be polarized: preservationists and neighborhood leaders fear even small changes to height restrictions will ruin the city's character. Developers and economic development proponents applaud new accommodations for burgeoning growth.
     
    But the issue is more nuanced. The height limit isn't the dominant issue. The prevailing debate needs to focus on more than aesthetics. Can Washington - driven equally by quality of life and engines of government and business - grown without an overall plan? And what do we want for our city's future?
     
    Download PDF →
    Taller Buildings Don't Have to be Ugly
  • FBI Building is a Chance for Development Community to be Bold

    The FBI’s J. Edgar Hoover Building may be the District’s most universally reviled landmark.  Designed in the 1960s and constructed in the 70s, it’s a standout example of whyBrutalist architecture came and went with such speed andabandon – a prototypical “design by committee” that was valiantlybattled over and rendered, not so much by architects Charles F. Murphy, as by the warring ambitions and demands of Washington bureaucrats.  

    Here on what may just be the country’s best site for redevelopment and almost guaranteed financial success, however, is a chance to seize one of the few times when government has yielded to the private sector. They’ve handed architects and developers an extraordinary opportunity to replace a pockmark on the District landscape with something truly thoughtful, useful, and timeless.  Instead of a monolith that has no connection to the cityscape, no rapport with people in and around it, and no relationship to its place on that grandest of all American boulevards, Pennsylvania Avenue, we can exercise an almost unheard-of prerogative to create something worthy of respect for generations to come.
     
    Download PDF →
    FBI Building is a Chance for Development Community to be Bold
  • Fault Lines in Architecture Debate

    The partisan thinking that is polarizing American politics in spectacular fashion today isn't the exclusive province of politicians. There a similar partisanship, characterized by a passaionate and scournful debate over architectural style, polarizing the design community, here and around the country. And the contentious discourse is obscuring a true discussion about the merits of the architecture we create today and the kinds of cities, towns and buildings in which we want to live.

    Download PDF →
    Fault Lines in Architecture Debate
  • A Place in the Sun: The Orioles Dress for Success

    Brooks Robinson, your table is waiting. Well, almost. If he had one, it would (no surprise) be located just behind third base, in a sparkling new climate-controlled pavilion lounge. In fact, right about now, and because it exists, we can all sit there.

    Felicitously fronting Euclid and 12th Streets in sunny Sarasota, Fla., the newly redesigned Ed Smith Stadium propelled the Baltimore Orioles to a 12-6 win over Tampa Bay on Tuesday – opening day of the 2011 exhibition season. Designed by D.C.-based David M. Schwarz Architects and architect of record Sarasota-based Hoyt Architects, the 85,000 s.f. addition to a nondescript precast concrete existing building went up at breakneck speed, about 18 months from firm selection to opening day. With up to 150 Hunt Construction workers logging double shifts, and the team having signed a 30-year agreement with Sarasota County last spring, the opening of the spirited new stadium came not a moment too soon.
     
    Download PDF →
    A Place in the Sun: The Orioles Dress for Success
Back
Postcard from Las Vegas: The Smith Center

Postcard from Las Vegas: The Smith Center

Vegas casinos have spent so much money and effort on creating miniature versions of the most urban places on earth -Venice, Rome, New York, Paris -yet have completely failed to build a single thing resembling a piece of real city. The Smith Center is exactly that missing element, a glimpse of genuine urbanity. It is not, however, entirely unthemed-it is executed in impeccable Jazz Age art deco.
close

Postcard from Las Vegas: The Smith Center

Vegas casinos have spent so much money and effort on creating miniature versions of the most urban places on earth -Venice, Rome, New York, Paris -yet have completely failed to build a single thing resembling a piece of real city. The Smith Center is exactly that missing element, a glimpse of genuine urbanity. It is not, however, entirely unthemed-it is executed in impeccable Jazz Age art deco. 

David M Schwarz, its architect, argues that deco is the city's default style, the style of the 1930s buildings beneath the neons and of the Hoover Dam. It's interesting that in the wake of the phenomenal success of a film such as The Artist , as pure a pastiche as it is possible to get, no critic has chided the director for using a historicist technique. Yet, in architecture, the merest whiff of a revival creates a murmur. Is that confidence in the absolute rightness of contemporaneity -or is it insecurity?

Either way, the Smith Center is an enjoyably complex work. 

Download Press Release PDF
Taller Buildings Don't Have to be Ugly

Taller Buildings Don't Have to be Ugly

The news that Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), who chairs the House committee overseeing the District, is considering easing building height restrictions in the nation's capitol has set the architecture and development communities abuzz. And like many other debates, the discussion threatens to be polarized: preservationists and neighborhood leaders fear even small changes to height restrictions will ruin the city's character. Developers and economic development proponents applaud new accommodations for burgeoning growth. But the issue is more nuanced. The height limit isn't the dominant issue. The prevailing debate needs to focus on more than aesthetics. Can Washington - driven equally by quality of life and engines of government and business - grown without an overall plan? And what do we want for our city's future?
close

Taller Buildings Don't Have to be Ugly

The news that Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif.), who chairs the House committee overseeing the District, is considering easing building height restrictions in the nation's capitol has set the architecture and development communities abuzz.

And like many other debates, the discussion threatens to be polarized: preservationists and neighborhood leaders fear even small changes to height restrictions will ruin the city's character. Developers and economic development proponents applaud new accommodations for burgeoning growth.
 
But the issue is more nuanced. The height limit isn't the dominant issue. The prevailing debate needs to focus on more than aesthetics. Can Washington - driven equally by quality of life and engines of government and business - grown without an overall plan? And what do we want for our city's future?
 
Download Press Release PDF
FBI Building is a Chance for Development Community to be Bold

FBI Building is a Chance for Development Community to be Bold

The FBI’s J. Edgar Hoover Building may be the District’s most universally reviled landmark. Designed in the 1960s and constructed in the 70s, it’s a standout example of whyBrutalist architecture came and went with such speed andabandon – a prototypical “design by committee” that was valiantlybattled over and rendered, not so much by architects Charles F. Murphy, as by the warring ambitions and demands of Washington bureaucrats.
close

FBI Building is a Chance for Development Community to be Bold

The FBI’s J. Edgar Hoover Building may be the District’s most universally reviled landmark.  Designed in the 1960s and constructed in the 70s, it’s a standout example of whyBrutalist architecture came and went with such speed andabandon – a prototypical “design by committee” that was valiantlybattled over and rendered, not so much by architects Charles F. Murphy, as by the warring ambitions and demands of Washington bureaucrats.  

Here on what may just be the country’s best site for redevelopment and almost guaranteed financial success, however, is a chance to seize one of the few times when government has yielded to the private sector. They’ve handed architects and developers an extraordinary opportunity to replace a pockmark on the District landscape with something truly thoughtful, useful, and timeless.  Instead of a monolith that has no connection to the cityscape, no rapport with people in and around it, and no relationship to its place on that grandest of all American boulevards, Pennsylvania Avenue, we can exercise an almost unheard-of prerogative to create something worthy of respect for generations to come.
 
Download Press Release PDF
Fault Lines in Architecture Debate

Fault Lines in Architecture Debate

The partisan thinking that is polarizing American politics in spectacular fashion today isn't the exclusive province of politicians. There a similar partisanship, characterized by a passaionate and scournful debate over architectural style, polarizing the design community, here and around the country. And the contentious discourse is obscuring a true discussion about the merits of the architecture we create today and the kinds of cities, towns and buildings in which we want to live.
close

Fault Lines in Architecture Debate

The partisan thinking that is polarizing American politics in spectacular fashion today isn't the exclusive province of politicians. There a similar partisanship, characterized by a passaionate and scournful debate over architectural style, polarizing the design community, here and around the country. And the contentious discourse is obscuring a true discussion about the merits of the architecture we create today and the kinds of cities, towns and buildings in which we want to live.

Download Press Release PDF
A Place in the Sun: The Orioles Dress for Success

A Place in the Sun: The Orioles Dress for Success

Brooks Robinson, your table is waiting. Well, almost. If he had one, it would (no surprise) be located just behind third base, in a sparkling new climate-controlled pavilion lounge. In fact, right about now, and because it exists, we can all sit there. Felicitously fronting Euclid and 12th Streets in sunny Sarasota, Fla., the newly redesigned Ed Smith Stadium propelled the Baltimore Orioles to a 12-6 win over Tampa Bay on Tuesday – opening day of the 2011 exhibition season.
close

A Place in the Sun: The Orioles Dress for Success

Brooks Robinson, your table is waiting. Well, almost. If he had one, it would (no surprise) be located just behind third base, in a sparkling new climate-controlled pavilion lounge. In fact, right about now, and because it exists, we can all sit there.

Felicitously fronting Euclid and 12th Streets in sunny Sarasota, Fla., the newly redesigned Ed Smith Stadium propelled the Baltimore Orioles to a 12-6 win over Tampa Bay on Tuesday – opening day of the 2011 exhibition season. Designed by D.C.-based David M. Schwarz Architects and architect of record Sarasota-based Hoyt Architects, the 85,000 s.f. addition to a nondescript precast concrete existing building went up at breakneck speed, about 18 months from firm selection to opening day. With up to 150 Hunt Construction workers logging double shifts, and the team having signed a 30-year agreement with Sarasota County last spring, the opening of the spirited new stadium came not a moment too soon.
 
Download Press Release PDF

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The Smith Center: Architect's Favorite Space

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The Smith Center: Myron Martin on the Story Behind The Smith Center

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The Smith Center: Myron Martin on the Art Program

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The Smith Center: Client Engagement

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Making It Work Smith Center Process

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Finding Context In Las Vegas

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Sundance Square Groundbreaking - Ed Bass Remarks

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Sundance Square: Ceremonial Opening of the Plaza Umbrellas

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Conversations on Architecture: Does Architecture Matter?

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Conversations on Architecture: What is Missing from Modern Architectural Discourse?

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Conversations on Architecture: Can Architecture be a Civilizing Force in Society?

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Liberal Traditionalism - Washington DC

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Gingertown Goes to Let's Talk Live!

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Texas Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, TX 1991

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Cook Children's Medical Center Lego Finale

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Creating Community Through a Collaborative Process

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Schermerhorn Symphony Center Construction Timelapse

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Urbanizing Suburbia

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The Smith Center for the Performing Arts - Fly Through

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American Airline Center Dallas, TX 2001

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Bass Performance Hall Fort Worth, TX 1996

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Restoring Civitas - Transforming Downtown Fort Worth

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Dr Pepper Ballpark Frisco, TX 2003

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Yale Class of 1954 Environmental Science Center 2001 Architecture

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David Schwarz on Architecture of the Palladium

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Schermerhorn Symphony Center Nashville, TN 2006

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Yale Class of 1954 Environmental Science Center 2001 Tour

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West Village Dallas, TX 2001

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1718 Connecticut Ave. Washington DC 1979

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DMSAS Canstruction 2011

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The Palladium

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CANSTRUCTION: Ben's Chili Bowl

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Cook Children's Medical Center

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David M. Schwarz Architects Newsletter: Volume 22

David M. Schwarz Architects Newsletter: Volume 23

David M. Schwarz Architects Newsletter: Volume 21

David M. Schwarz Architects Newsletter: Volume 20

David M. Schwarz Architects Newsletter: Volume 19

David M. Schwarz Architects Newsletter: Volume 18

David M. Schwarz Architects Newsletter: Volume 17

David M. Schwarz Architects Newsletter: Volume 16

David M. Schwarz Architects Newsletter: Volume 15

David M. Schwarz Architects Newsletter: Volume 14

David M. Schwarz Architects Newsletter: Volume 13

Davis M. Schwarz Architects Newsletter: Volume 12

David M. Schwarz Architects Newsletter: Volume 11

David M. Schwarz Architects Newsletter: Volume 10

David M. Schwarz Architects Newsletter: Volume 9

David M. Schwarz Architects Newsletter: Volume 8

David M. Schwarz Architects Newsletter: Volume 7

David M. Schwarz Architects, Inc.
1707 L Street NW
Suite 400
Washington, D.C. 20036

P: (202) 862-0777
F: (202) 331-0507

info@dmsas.com

We are always looking for highly motivated individuals. One to five years architectural office experience is preferable.

Steve Knight
employment@dmsas.com

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